Behringer Ultimate 7-Band Graphic Equalizer

Behringer

$42.99
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SKU:
BEQ700
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Master of Tone

With 15 dB available boost or cut per band, the BEQ700’s seven frequency bands have been carefully chosen to provide the ultimate tools for EQing the bass guitar, even extended range instruments. Of course, to make full use of its capabilities, you should first understand some basics about the frequency range of your axe.

The BEQ700 covers the audio spectrum from below 50 Hz to over 10 kHz, allowing you to effectively cut or boost specific frequencies that help focus your sound. Special attention has been paid to the critical midrange frequencies, which can either make or break your sound. The following section offers tips that will have you sculpting the perfect bass sound in no time at all.

How Does Equalization Work?

Imagine the audio frequency range as a very wide highway with lots of “lanes”. Each of these lanes represents a specific frequency band.

  • The lanes on the left side contain the really low frequency content, mainly bass, bass vocals, and the kick and tom drums
  • The middle lanes make up the fundamental zone of most musical instruments and the male and female vocals
  • The right-hand lanes have all the high-frequency stuff , such as snare drums, cymbals, higher pitched percussion instruments and the content that adds sizzle to the mix
Applying EQ to Bass Instruments

When frequencies from 20 Hz - 200 Hz are boosted or cut, the bass is affected dramatically, since sounds in this range are often felt, as well as being heard. Boosting frequencies within this range can increase the sensation of power and punch. Conversely, reductions in this range can weaken or muddy low-frequency response.

The fundamental notes of most basses fall within the 40 Hz - 1000 Hz range. Even slight changes in this range can cause a tremendous variation in overall bass energy and impact, as the human ear is especially sensitive to this range. Boosting frequencies around 200 Hz often gives the bass warmth and body, without a loss of definition, while boosting frequencies in the 500 Hz to 1000 Hz range tend to make bass sounds brittle. Often, better EQ results can be achieved by reducing the frequency bands that are off ending, and by turning up the overall volume rather than boosting one specific band.